Cancer and molecular medicine concentration

CaMM on steps

The doctoral degree in Clinical and Translational Sciences with the cancer and molecular medicine concentration is designed to train students in the research skills required to perform translational research in cancer and molecular medicine. Students will carry out translational research projects, which will use experimental models. To facilitate the bridging of the bench and clinical sciences, students will have both a research and a clinical mentor.

The marriage of cancer and molecular medicine blends established cancer biology with an emerging field, molecular medicine. The concentration serves as an educational program for Ph.D. students encompassing the research objectives of the VCU Massey Cancer Center, the VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine and the VCU Center for Clinical and Translational Research.

See the VCU Bulletins for program details and degree requirements. Visit the Graduate Admissions website for instructions on how to apply.

Key faculty members

Joyce Lloyd, Ph.D.

Joyce Lloyd, Ph.D.

Email: jlloyd@vcu.edu

Title: Professor, Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, VCU School of Medicine

Research interests: Roles of the Kruppel-like transcription factors in globin gene regulation, erythropoiesis and cardiovascular development

About the program: “VCU is a great place for a Ph.D. student to study molecular medicine because we have outstanding translational scientists working in this area, their research is well-funded, and the environment at VCU is highly collaborative.”


Devanand Sarkar, Ph.D.

Devanand Sarkar, Ph.D.

Email: dsarkar@vcu.edu

Title: Associate professor, Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, VCU School of Medicine

Research interests: Understanding molecular mechanism of liver cancer and developing new therapies

About the program: “Most of the scientists in VCU aim to identify molecular mechanism of diseases and use that knowledge to develop novel therapies. The CAMM program provides the unique opportunity to work on basic science and simultaneously learn how to translate that experience in the clinical arena. More importantly by working with Physician-Scientists students might have the opportunity to be involved directly into a translational process. VCU and CAMM thus provide an ideal environment to master both the basic research as well as learn how to direct the research for the benefit of the patients.”